Cheryl Phelan - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage - Plymouth

Posted by Cheryl Phelan on 7/5/2017

If you’re in the process of moving, you don’t necessarily need to hire a moving company. Hiring movers is only one option of many when it comes to getting your stuff from place to place. If you want to save some money on your move, you should check out alternatives to hiring movers.  


If you don’t want to drive your own moving truck, but still could use some assistance on your move, you should take a look at container moving. You fill up the container with all of your stuff, and the company will get the container from place to place for you. This is especially helpful if you are doing a long-distance move.


You can always rent your own truck, pack your own stuff, and head out the door on your own. You’ll pay for gas and mileage, but have control of your own timeframe. Moving companies often have many different resources available to help you in the process including boxes and packing supplies. National companies provide convenient truck returns over most parts of the country where you’ll be, so it’s easy to get the truck back. 

Ship Your Stuff

If you happen to be moving a long distance, sometimes, it’s more cost effective to let the big stuff go. Ship items like clothes, books, DVDs, and other personal belongings that can’t easily be replaced. Sell big items like beds and sofas. 

You can use many different kinds of shipping services, or even use air cargo to get your things from one place to another. While you’ll need to purchase some furniture when you get to your final destination, this could be a good option, especially if you’re looking to start over, or if you don’t own a whole lot of furniture and large items.

Use Your Car

Your car is always an option to help you move no matter where you are moving to. Whether you’re moving across the country or just across town, you’ll probably need to pack your car. It’s also a lot of fun to have your car for a road trip on long distances. This way, you’ll have a lot of stuff with you, but you can still travel and see many things that you wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

Tips For Packing The Car

You want to be able to get the maximum packing space out of your car for the move, no matter how far you’re going. First, you should plan how you’ll pack ahead of time. You don’t want to save the task of packing the car for moving day. Also, you need to make sure that there will be room for every living thing that needs to go into the car like children and pets. Those are important and you definitely don’t want them all squished in between some boxes during a long move!

Tags: moving tips   packing  
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Posted by Cheryl Phelan on 2/8/2017

Moving can be a daunting task. There are so many things to keep track of and a lot of feelings come up along the way as you pack up your home and live in chaos for the next few weeks leading up to, and even after, the move. Never fear! There are things you can do to make the moving process go all the more smooth, so whether it's your first time or your fifth you'll look like a downright pro! Prepare ahead of time - create a master list of everything that needs to be done before, during, and after the move. Take note of important deadlines and create a master timeline like move out and move in dates, utility cancellations in the old house, utility set up in the new house and when to hand in the keys. Put together an overnight bag with all your personal necessities you'll need on hand during the move and a box full of the everyday house goods you will need on hand your first day in the new house. Decide on which order you are going to pack up your rooms and add these days to your deadline list. You will also want to make a list of any repairs and cleaning that needs to be done before moving day. Strategize - Know where everything is going ahead of time. This means a room by room plan prepared before moving day. Label boxes with not only what is inside but what room it will need to go into. You can even take this a step further by color coding boxes by room. If you need to take furniture apart, pack the screws and small bits in a sandwich bag and label what furniture they belong to. If hiring movers, review any requirements they might have for move in day as some will only move boxes and not trash bags. Clean out - get rid of as much as possible at least a month before moving. The less there is to move, the easier it will be to pack up with less to carry. Anything shoved to the back of cupboards or closets and long forgotten can go. Do a closet purge and donate unwanted clothes. Hold a yard sale or put valuable items up for sale ahead of time to give yourself plenty of the time to get rid of things before you start packing. Don't add to the stock in your fridge during the last two weeks and consume what you can as moving day approaches. Allow your fridge to defrost the day before the move. During the move - stretch wrap any furniture with drawers to hold them in place. Pack a cooler with lunch and/or snack items ahead of time and keep it easily accessible during the move to refuel throughout the day. Clean and prepare the bathroom first stock it with soap, toilet paper, and towels. It will be good to go to take a shower at the end of the moving day! The list of things that need to get done when moving can be overwhelming, but with a master list in hand and some tricks up your sleeve, you can make the process feel a lot less stressful. In fact, you might even enjoy it!

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Posted by Cheryl Phelan on 1/11/2017

We all know moving is a stressful time, but for cats, it can be a bigger upheaval than for their human counterparts. Your home is your cat's territory. By taking them out of their familiar environment and into a completely new one can be extremely overwhelming for them. However, there are a few things you can do to make the move a more comfortable process for your feline friend. Creature comforts - establish the carrier as a safe, comfortable place for your cat to be as soon as you can. Leave it out a few weeks before the move for your cat to become comfortable with its presence. Putting blankets and the occasional treat inside will help your cat warm up to the carrier more quickly. Try to stick to normal feeding routines as much as possible in the days leading up to and after the move to give your cat some semblance of normalcy throughout the environmental changes. During the move - consider keeping your cat in a separate room while the moving process is taking place. This ensures not only that they won't slip out any open doors, but they also won't be underfoot or become stressed by the chaos of moving. Place a sign on the door to let everyone know that the cat is in the room. You will want to leave a litter box, food, water and their carrier in the room with them. Pack this room last and put the cat in the carrier before you begin packing up this final room. Stay safe - when cats are nervous they seek out small spaces to comfort themselves. To prevent your cat from getting stuck monitor them in the kitchen and other rooms with small gaps. You will also want to ensure that all window screens are securely in place. If you have an outdoor cat wait two to four weeks before allowing them to roam outside. Be sure to update your cat's tag and/or microchip with your new address and phone number. Comfort zone - set up a safe room in the new house for your cat to stay in for the first few weeks after the move. Being confined to a smaller section of the new house will put your cat more at ease. Place their favorite toys and bedding in the room with them as well as food, water, and a litterbox. If you want to keep the litter box in a different room have two litter boxes, one in the safe room and one in the room you would normally like it until your cat becomes comfortable with the rest of the house and new litter box location. Cats are creatures of habit and drastic changes like a move can cause them to become distressed. By taking a few preliminary steps throughout the moving process like slowly introducing them to their carrier and creating a comfort zone you can ensure your cat enjoys your new home just as much as you do!

Tags: moving tips   cats   moving  
Categories: Uncategorized  

Posted by Cheryl Phelan on 11/23/2016

Have you ever been away on vacation or traveling for work and had a difficult time getting to sleep at the hotel? Have you ever moved and it took a while for your new house to start to feel like home? Dogs experience these feelings as well, especially older dogs who have gotten used to their environment at their old home. However, there are some things you can do to help your dog become acclimated to her new home. Whether you and your family already have a dog and are planning a move or if you've recently adopted a new canine friend here are some tips that will help them feel at ease and welcomed in their new home.

Adopted dogs

Adopting an older dog is a wonderful thing. When you adopt, you are supporting animal shelters that provide an indispensable service to our communities. You're also giving a dog a second chance at a happy life, rather than being overlooked for a puppy. Adopted dogs require special care when moving to a new home. Not only is their environment new, but so is their company. Here are some tips for acclimating your adopted dog to her new home:
  • As soon as you get home, take the dog to where she will be doing her business to get her used to the area. Reward her when she urinates there
  • While your dog gets used to her new home she may have accidents indoors, but with time she'll learn where her bathroom is. Be patient.
  • When your dog first gets inside her new home, let her explore it freely so she feels safe
  • If you have small children, remind them to give the dog her space while she gets used to her new environment
  • Establish training rules with your family. You should all be on the same page about what behavior is acceptable. Similarly, you should all be using the same commands (i.e., everyone should say either "come" or "here, girl," not a combination of both)
  • If the dog had a crate that she liked to stay in or a favorite toy make sure you let her have these items in the space that will be her bed
  • Show your ne dog plently of love when she comes to you, but give her space when she needs it

Moving with Your Dog

If you and your pet are moving to a new home, many of the same techniques apply as adopting a dog. Your pet will be unfamiliar with their environment, but you'll have the advantage of them being familiar with you. Here are some tips for moving to a new home with your pet.
  • Bring all of their favorite items into the new home before the dog sees it. Food bowls, crate, toys, leashes, etc. Having these familiar sights and smells in their new home will help them acclimate
  • Bring your dog to their new neighborhood for a walk before the move if possible
  • Stick to your dog's old schedule as much as possible; breakfast and dinner times, walks, and when to go out to the bathroom should be the same as before the move
  • Have your dog around often during the moving process. Remain calm so that your dog understands that everything is okay

Posted by Cheryl Phelan on 9/14/2016

Moving can be stressful. The best way to not get overwhelmed is to have an organized plan and a step-by-step timeline. A little preparation will help make the move go a lot smoother. Here is a checklist to help keep you on track: 60 Days Before You Move

  • Sort and Purge-Go through every room, decide what needs to come with you and what can go. Make piles of things to throw away and things to donate.
  • Plan a Yard Sale-Start planning a yard sale to reduce the amount of stuff you need to move. Some extra money for the move will also come in handy.
  • Hire a Mover-Contact at least three moving companies. On-site estimates are better than over the phone or internet estimates. Get each estimate in writing, and make sure it has a USDOT (U.S. Department of Transportation) number on it.
  • Create a Moving Binder-Store all of your move-related paperwork (checklists, contracts, receipts) in a binder. You may also want to inventory all of your items with photos or lists.
Six Weeks Before Your Move
  • Get Packing Supplies-Determine how many packing supplies you’ll need and designate a room where you can begin to store and organize.
  • Take Measurements-If possible get room dimensions of your new home. Make sure large pieces of furniture will fit.  Don’t forget to take measurements for appliances too.
30 Days Before Your Move
  • Confirm with Mover-Check with your mover the details of your move.
  • Start Packing-Begin packing out-of-season clothes and unnecessary items.
  • Label-Make sure to label boxes with what rooms the boxes will go in at your new home.
  • Start/Stop Utilities-Make arrangements to connect and disconnect your cable, internet and utilities.
  • Change your Address- Contact or visit your local Post Office to obtain a Change of Address form. You can also obtain this form online at
  • Make Notifications- Change your address to the following: registry of motor vehicles, banks, schools, friends & family, insurance companies, doctors and specialists, cell phone providers, credit card companies and magazine and newspapers.
  • Contact Service Providers—Notify landscapers, cleaning services that you are moving, and look for new ones in your new hometown.
Two Weeks Before Your Move
  • Call Locksmith- Have your new home’s locks changed on moving day or before.
  • Arrange Services- Have a cleaning company prepare the new home before you arrive and tidy the old home after you leave. Arrange for carpet cleaning too.
  • Pack the bulk of your items.
  • Start Cleaning-Begin cleaning any rooms in your house that have been emptied, such as closets, basements or attics.
One Week Before Your Move
  • Pack Suitcases- Finish your general packing a few days before your moving date. Pack suitcases for everyone in the family with enough clothes to wear for a few days.
  • Gather Keys- Organize all keys, alarm codes and garage door openers so that you can be prepared to hand them over to the new owner or real estate agent.
A Few Days Before Your Move
  • Defrost the Freezer- Empty, clean and defrost the freezer at least 24 hours before moving day.
  • Make Payment Plans- You will need to make sure you have made arrangements to pay the mover and have a tip (usually 10%-15%).
Moving Day
  • List Contact Info- Write out a list for your movers of things they’ll need: phone numbers, exact moving address and maps.
  • Take Inventory- Before the movers leave, sign the bill of lading/inventory list and keep a copy.
  • Walk-Through- Do a walk-through of your new home with your real estate agent.
  • Layout New Home- Tape names to doors to assist movers in placing furniture and boxes.
  • Have Director- Arrange for someone to direct the movers at your new home.